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Exempt from the Canadian ELD Mandate? Here’s 5 reasons to comply anyways

With the Canadian Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate taking effect in less than two years, details are beginning to surface around who’s going to be affected — and who’s not. Until adopted by any one or more of the 10 Canadian Provinces, Canada’s ELD mandate only applies to federally-regulated carriers that operate across provincial boundaries of Canada and into the U.S., not to those who operate solely within Canada’s ten individual provinces. However, the Canadian Trucking Alliance and its president, Stephen Laskowski, are spearheading conversations urging ELD-exempt provincial leaders to adopt the technology and achieve a regulated system of logging…

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Final Canadian ELD Mandate Rules Announced

The final Canadian electronic logging device (ELD) Mandate was announced today by Canadian Transport Minister Marc Garneau. As expected, the rules state that ELD solution providers must obtain certification from a third-party to ensure their solutions meet the necessarily-complex technical standards set forth by Transport Canada. After receiving feedback from various stakeholders (e.g., ELD providers, associations and carriers), Transport Canada worked to better harmonize the Canadian ELD Mandate with the ELD Mandate passed in the United States. This has allowed Transport Canada to accelerate the implementation of the Canadian ELD Mandate from the four years initially proposed in Gazette I…

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Canadian ELD Mandate Updates

Updated October 16, 2018 The final Canadian ELD Mandate rule is expected to release this year or in the first quarter of 2019 (best guesses). While the full information is still not available, fleets can still educate themselves to prepare. A lot of the proposed rule is expected to be similar to the U.S. ELD Mandate — great news for the many Canadian carriers whose business involves cross-border transit and already need to comply with the U.S. mandate for that reason. Transport Canada published a proposed rule in the Canada Gazette last December, the same time the U.S. ELD Mandate…

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Debunking the Myth Around ELD and Crossing Borders

There have been many different stories in the trucking business throughout the past six months when it comes to questions of ELD compliance among Canadian and Mexican drivers and trucking companies operating in the United States. The rumor was that non-U.S. drivers and/or trucking companies could avoid complying with the much-talked-about Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate, which took effect Dec. 18, 2017, as long as their trucks returned to the home bases outside the U.S. every night. As with most rumors there’s a bit of truth to that — but only a part. The new regulation does grant a waiver…

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Canada Announces ELD Mandate Draft, Gives 60 Days for Public Comment

This week, the first draft of the long-awaited Canadian ELD Mandate was published. This news came at the same time as the deadline carriers had to comply with the U.S. version of the ELD Mandate. Canadian Minister of Transport Marc Garneau met with transportation leaders in Ontario this week to present the rule, which will be finalized in Canada Gazette II. Like the U.S. version, the Canadian ELD Mandate won’t change the Hours of Service regulations, just how drive time is recorded and reported. The rule will require replacing paper logs with a regulation-compliant device that connects directly to the…

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Canadian ELD Update

We have been engaged with CCMTA Canada since 2012 regarding the Canadian ELD Mandate and there has been notable movement in the past year. 2012 was when Omnitracs first provided comments to the Canadian government and in July of 2016 we were asked to submit additional comments and suggestions, which we provided technical suggestions to the then proposed requirements. Approximately three weeks ago, Omnitracs received another version of the regulation and we were requested to supply comments on the technical specifications of the regulation. We submitted additional commentary and had confirmation of understanding discussions on submitted comments with Canadian Council…

HOS fines are racking up! $343,647,360.00 HOS fines since the beginning of 2016*
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